Colin Powell endorsement of Barack Obama–another look

October 31, 2008

Colin Powell’s endorsement of Barack Obama is certainly one of the high points of the 2008 Election. 

As we enter the final 4 days of the campaign, Colin Powell’s words from the October 19th “Meet the Press” bear repeating, especially for an undecided voters at this point:

I know both of these individuals very well now. I’ve known John for 25 years as your setup said. And I’ve gotten to know Mr. Obama quite well over the past two years. Both of them are distinguished Americans who are patriotic, who are dedicated to the welfare of our country. Either one of them, I think, would be a good president. I have said to Mr. McCain that I admire all he has done.

I have some concerns about the direction that the party has taken in recent years. It has moved more to the right than I would like to see it, but that’s a choice the party makes. And I’ve said to Mr. Obama, “You have to pass a test of do you have enough experience, and do you bring the judgment to the table that would give us confidence that you would be a good president.” And I’ve watched him over the past two years, frankly, and I’ve had this conversation with him.

I have especially watched over the last six of seven weeks as both of them have really taken a final exam with respect to this economic crisis that we are in and coming out of the conventions. And I must say that I’ve gotten a good measure of both. In the case of Mr. McCain, I found that he was a little unsure as to deal with the economic problems that we were having and almost every day there was a different approach to the problem. And that concerned me, sensing that he didn’t have a complete grasp of the economic problems that we had.

And I was also concerned at the selection of Governor Palin. She’s a very distinguished woman, and she’s to be admired; but at the same time, now that we have had a chance to watch her for some seven weeks, I don’t believe she’s ready to be president of the United States, which is the job of the vice president. And so that raised some question in my mind as to the judgment that Senator McCain made.

On the Obama side, I watched Mr. Obama and I watched him during this seven-week period. And he displayed a steadiness, an intellectual curiosity, a depth of knowledge and an approach to looking at problems like this and picking a vice president that, I think, is ready to be president on day one. And also, in not just jumping in and changing every day, but showing intellectual vigor. I think that he has a, a definitive way of doing business that would serve us well.

I also believe that on the Republican side over the last seven weeks, the approach of the Republican Party and Mr. McCain has become narrower and narrower. Mr. Obama, at the same time, has given us a more inclusive, broader reach into the needs and aspirations of our people. He’s crossing lines–ethnic lines, racial lines, generational lines. He’s thinking about all villages have values, all towns have values, not just small towns have values.

And I’ve also been disappointed, frankly, by some of the approaches that Senator McCain has taken recently, or his campaign ads, on issues that are not really central to the problems that the American people are worried about. This Bill Ayers situation that’s been going on for weeks became something of a central point of the campaign.

But Mr. McCain says that he’s a washed-out terrorist. Well, then, why do we keep talking about him? And why do we have these robocalls going on around the country trying to suggest that, because of this very, very limited relationship that Senator Obama has had with Mr. Ayers, somehow, Mr. Obama is tainted. What they’re trying to connect him to is some kind of terrorist feelings. And I think that’s inappropriate.

Now, I understand what politics is all about. I know how you can go after one another, and that’s good. But I think this goes too far. And I think it has made the McCain campaign look a little narrow. It’s not what the American people are looking for. And I look at these kinds of approaches to the campaign and they trouble me. And the party has moved even further to the right, and Governor Palin has indicated a further rightward shift. I would have difficulty with two more conservative appointments to the Supreme Court, but that’s what we’d be looking at in a McCain administration.

I’m also troubled by, not what Senator McCain says, but what members of the party say. And it is permitted to be said such things as, “Well, you know that Mr. Obama is a Muslim.” Well, the correct answer is, he is not a Muslim, he’s a Christian. He’s always been a Christian.

But the really right answer is, what if he is? Is there something wrong with being a Muslim in this country? The answer’s no, that’s not America. Is there something wrong with some seven-year-old Muslim-American kid believing that he or she could be president? Yet, I have heard senior members of my own party drop the suggestion, “He’s a Muslim and he might be associated terrorists.”

This is not the way we should be doing it in America. I feel strongly about this particular point because of a picture I saw in a magazine. It was a photo essay about troops who are serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. And one picture at the tail end of this photo essay was of a mother in Arlington Cemetery, and she had her head on the headstone of her son’s grave. And as the picture focused in, you could see the writing on the headstone. And it gave his awards–Purple Heart, Bronze Star–showed that he died in Iraq, gave his date of birth, date of death. He was 20 years old. And then, at the very top of the headstone, it didn’t have a Christian cross, it didn’t have the Star of David, it had crescent and a star of the Islamic faith. And his name was Kareem Rashad Sultan Khan, and he was an American. He was born in New Jersey. He was 14 years old at the time of 9/11, and he waited until he can go serve his country, and he gave his life.

Now, we have got to stop polarizing ourself in this way. And John McCain is as nondiscriminatory as anyone I know. But I’m troubled about the fact that, within the party, we have these kinds of expressions. So, when I look at all of this and I think back to my Army career, we’ve got two individuals, either one of them could be a good president. But which is the president that we need now? Which is the individual that serves the needs of the nation for the next period of time?

And I come to the conclusion that because of his ability to inspire, because of the inclusive nature of his campaign, because he is reaching out all across America, because of who he is and his rhetorical abilities–and we have to take that into account–as well as his substance–he has both style and substance–he has met the standard of being a successful president, being an exceptional president.

I think he is a transformational figure. He is a new generation coming into the world– onto the world stage, onto the American stage, and for that reason I’ll be voting for Senator Barack Obama.

Wow! Colin Powell makes a compelling case for the Obama-Biden ticket in 2008.  Democrat Dave


What to do with Sarah Palin’s $1200 energy check to Alaskans?

October 31, 2008

From my esteemed colleague at Mudflats (http://mudflats.wordpress.com) comes this gem:

I got my $1200 energy rebate check from Sarah Palin a couple weeks ago, and so did every other human being in Alaska.  This money, which came from the wealth of oil companies doing business in Alaska, got spread around by the Governor to help Alaskans defray the rising costs of energy that made the oil companies profitable enough to provide Alaska with the money for the rebate check that defrays the cost of energy…..(you get the circular idea).

At the Alaska Women Reject Palin rally here in Anchorage, a woman drove by as I was returning to my car. She leaned out of her window and said, “Are you going to get a $1200 check this year?” “You mean the rebate check? Yes,” I said. “So how can you hate Sarah Palin!?!” she quipped, looking angry and smug at the same time. “Are you going to SPEND it???” she spat. I said the first thing that came to mind, “Yes, I’ll probably donate it to the Obama campaign.” She screeched away.

And I didn’t tell her the whole truth. I’ve actually spread my wealth around to lots of good progressive candidates, both in Alaska and outside.

Priceless.  Democrat Dave


Dick Cheney supports Barack Obama

October 31, 2008

In the spirit of acknowledging all the disingenuous lies and distortions of the McCain-Palin campaign, I made up this headline.  But, unlike the McCain-Palin campaign, I acknowledge that it’s not true. 

One of the leading neo-conservatives has, indeed, thrown his support to Barack Obama.   This guy isn’t from the “liberal media.” From the Huffington Post on the 30th of October, 2008, comes the following:

Francis Fukuyama, the prominent academic and an early intellectual defender of neoconservatism, endorses Barack Obama in the pages of the American Conservative magazine:

I’m voting for Barack Obama this November for a very simple reason. It is hard to imagine a more disastrous presidency than that of George W. Bush. It was bad enough that he launched an unnecessary war and undermined the standing of the United States throughout the world in his first term. But in the waning days of his administration, he is presiding over a collapse of the American financial system and broader economy that will have consequences for years to come. As a general rule, democracies don’t work well if voters do not hold political parties accountable for failure. While John McCain is trying desperately to pretend that he never had anything to do with the Republican Party, I think it would a travesty to reward the Republicans for failure on such a grand scale.
McCain’s appeal was always that he could think for himself, but as the campaign has progressed, he has seemed simply erratic and hotheaded. His choice of Sarah Palin as a running mate was highly irresponsible; we have suffered under the current president who entered office without much knowledge of the world and was easily captured by the wrong advisers. McCain’s lurching from Reaganite free- marketer to populist tribune makes one wonder whether he has any underlying principles at all.

So, why is anyone voting for the McCain-Palin ticket at this point? This guy has nailed it.

Enough! Obama-Biden in 2008. Democrat Dave


McCain needs help with economy–his choice?

October 29, 2008

John McCain has always admitted that the economy is not his strength. Damn the bad luck–that’s where we need the most help right now. Check out this 30-second video clip:

Democrat Dave


Let’s put an end to McCain-Palin lies about Barack Obama’s tax plans

October 29, 2008

If you’re sick and tired of John McCain’s non-stop stream of lies about Barack Obama’s tax plan, this video can help you put an end to it.  From JedL over at DailyKos comes this gem.

 

As JedL says:

As the video shows, the fact is that under Obama’s plan, 95% of Americans — including Joe the Plumber — would get a tax cut. Income over $250,000 would be taxed at pre-Bush levels (same as during the Clinton years).

That’s not spreading the wealth — that’s a tax plan designed to create wealth by strengthening the middle class.

Don’t tell Matt Drudge or FOX News, but John McCain himself took the same basic approach to taxes as Barack Obama — at least until the 2008 presidential campaign brought about some changes in his views.

Now, with just six days to go, the only thing John McCain has left to run on is a bogus and hypocritical attack on Barack Obama’s tax cut plan. To the extent this video can help reveal that truth, getting it into enough hands could help put an end to John McCain’s lies about Obama’s tax cut plan.

Thanks! Democrat Dave


Barack Obama draws 100,000 in Denver; John McCain trying to raise money

October 26, 2008

When things are going well, they’re going really well.  Barack Obama drew approximately 100,000 people to a rally in Denver today.  Guess folks want to see the next President of the United States.

I happened to receive a John McCain solicitation trying to raise money.  Immediately made me donate another $100 to Barack Obama.  Don’t worry–I’ll send in the GOP fund-raising solicitation (they pay the postage) and let them know I donated money to Barack Obama in John McCain’s name.

Here’s some key points from John McCain’s letter (you may want to grab a Kleenex before reading further–it may make you tear up a bit–not):

Dear Friend,

We’ve reached a critical juncture in the campaign.  The Obama Democrats and their left-wing, special interest allies have come forward in a united front combining their enoromous fundraising arsenal.  Meanwhile, the national Democrats led by Chairman Howard Dean are stepping up their cynical campaign of distortions and outright lies, and with the help of their cronies, are raising staggering amounts of money.

My friend, the last thing we Republicans can afford is to have our hands tied behind our backs due to the fact that their candidate broke his promise to the American people and refused to accept the presidential campaign spending limit–which means they will have no limit as to what they can raise and spend.

We simply can’t be in a situation where the Democrats hold a huge financial advantage over us in the last crucial month leading up to the elections.  That’s why I am writing to you today, as a most valued and trusted member of our Party.

You support is essential right now.  So, please send in a generous Emergency Membership Contribution of $35, $50, $100, $500 or even more if you can afford it.

…I would not ask for your help if the circumstances were not so dire.  However, it is clear that the weeks and days ahead will be the most important yet in our battle to defeat the Democrats and their deeply flawed policies that embrace higher taxes, more government spending, socialized medicine and surrender in Iraq.

…Thank you for your steadfast support of our Party and our country.

Sincerely, John McCain

John McCain lies even in his fundraising messages. What a pathetic guy he’s become as a result of this election.  But, that issue aside–since McCain accepted public funds, how can he still be raising money?  Or, do those rules not apply because “McCain says so?”

Enough!! Obama-Biden in 2008! Democrat Dave


Apple opposes California’s Proposition 8

October 25, 2008

Apple has not only come out against Proposition 8–an amendment that proposes a California state constitutional amendment that would ban same-sex marriage–it has offered funding to defeat the initiative.   Here’s Apple’s press release:

No on Prop 8

October 24, 2008

Apple is publicly opposing Proposition 8 and making a donation of $100,000 to the No on 8 campaign. Apple was among the first California companies to offer equal rights and benefits to our employees’ same-sex partners, and we strongly believe that a person’s fundamental rights — including the right to marry — should not be affected by their sexual orientation. Apple views this as a civil rights issue, rather than just a political issue, and is therefore speaking out publicly against Proposition 8.

I urge a No vote on Proposition 8. Thank you, Apple, for seeing it the same way!! Democrat Dave